Thursday, March 4, 2021

February Reading List

 February felt like the longest month ever, 2021 has already felt like a long year… and usually I am ready to welcome the warm weather with open arms, but this year, the idea of spring is kind of depressing for me, because that is the year marker of knowingly living with Covid. On the upside, we know have a vaccine, some things are returning to normal, and hopefully there will be a light at the end of the tunnel soon. In the meantime, here is a roundup of all the books I read in February!

Cobble Hill, by Cecily von Ziegesar

For those of you who were in middle or high school during the early 2000’s, then chances are that you probably read the Gossip Girl series, before it was even a book. I was actually super excited to read Cobble Hill since it is written by the same author as Gossip Girl… I hate to say it, and maybe my expectation level was too high, but this book honestly fell a little short for me. 

 

Cobble Hill centers around an eclectic Brooklyn neighborhood, and follows the lives of three of the families who live in the neighborhood, and the drama that goes on within their everyday lives

 

The Queen’s Gambit, by Walter Tevis, Amy Landon

I don’t say this about many books/ books that have been made into movies, but I actually like the Netflix series better than the book. I listened to The Queen’s Gambit on Audible, and the narration was fantastic, and maybe it’s because I saw the series first, and there weren’t many changes that were made from the original version, but it was enough where you might favor one over the other.

 

All We Ever Wanted, by Emily Giffin

Just on a personal level, this book was so fun to read, because it’s set in Nashville and it was fun seeing places, streets, landmarks, etc. that I recognized. 

 

This book demonstrates the impact one picture can have in the day of modern day technology, the thought process of those from different backgrounds, and how everything comes into focus

 

Sugar Rush, by Donna Kauffman

This was such a fun light-hearted book to listen to on audio; if you need an escape from the news, etc. I highly recommend this book. 

 

Leilani left her job as a chef in NYC to return home to her hometown of Sugarberry, Georgia to be closer to her father. However, her past manages to follow her down South… Her old boss, Baxter Dunn {aka Chef Hot Cakes}, wants to film his popular cooking show in her brand new bakery, and let just say that cakes are not the only thing getting cooked up in the kitchen!. 

 

After Leilani leaves NYC Chef Dunn realizes his true feelings for her and realizes he much have her back in his life, but convincing her is another story. 

 

A Man Called Ove, by Fredrik Backman

At the end of last year I read Anxious People and Backman has the ability to take things that should now be funny, at all, funny. Backman does not disappoint with A Man Called Ove, and yes, humor is added to a subjected matter that again, should not be funny. 

 

Behind Ove’s cranky exterior is a man in morning over the loss of his wife. All Ove wants to do is go be with his wife and keeps making failed attempts in the efforts of doing so. However, a new neighbor with two chatty girls, a stay cat, and unexpected friendship interfere with these attempt. A funny and heartwarming story. 

3 comments:

  1. I have been thinking about purchasing the book 'The Queen's Gambit' by Walter Tevis and Amy Landon. I watched the NetFlix Limited Series 'The Queen's Gambit' several times, read about it in 'Chess Life', and saw interviews with chess grandmaster Bruce_Pandolfini, former world champion Garry Kasparov, Twice U.S. women's champion+grandmaster Jennifer Shahade and Judit Polgar, the strongest female chess player of all time, who became a grandmaster at 15.
    I understand the character Benny in the movie was a composite of different characters in the book. I am sure the book is an interesting read!

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